Eric Schliesser

Faculty of Arts and Philosophy
Philosophy and Moral Sciences

Room 2.10A, Blandijnberg 2

Eric Schliesser (Tufts BA, 1993; Chicago PhD, 2002) is BOF Research Professor in Philosophy and Moral Sciences. He loves exploring seventeenth and eighteenth century philosophy and its relationship(s) with the sciences, moral philosophy, and political economy. He has published extensively on Newton, Huygens, Spinoza, Berkeley, Hume, Adam Smith, Sophie De Grouchy, and a little bit on Kant. He also writes about philosophy of economics, mostly by way of the history of twentieth century economics (especially Chicago Economics). He has also published a bit on Babylonian economics and Greek astronomy. He has promised Routledge a monograph on Adam Smith for the prestigious Routledge Philosophers Series. He is the co-editor of New Voices on Adam Smith (Routledge 2006), the co-editor of Interpreting Newton (Cambridge, 2012), the co-editor of the Oxford Handbook on Isaac Newton (in progress), the co-editor of The Methodology of the History of Philosophy (forthcoming with Oxford), the editor of Ten Neglected Classic Texts in the History of Philosophy (forthcoming with Oxford), and the editor of a volume on Sympathy from Plato to Experimental Economics (forthcoming with Oxford).

Selected publications: 

• "On Reading Newton as An Epicurean: Kant, Spinozism and the Changes to the Principia", Studies in the History and Philosophy of Science: Series A (forthcoming)
• "Inventing Paradigms, Monopoly and Methodology at 'Chicago:' Nutter, Stigler, and Milton Friedman", Studies in the History and Philosophy of Science: Series A (2012) 43: 160–171; doi:10.1016/j.shpsa.2011.11.006
• With Chris Smeenk, "Newton's Principia" The Oxford Handbook for the History of Physics, edited by Jed Buchwald, Oxford: Oxford University Press (forthcoming 2012)
• "Spinoza and the Philosophy of Science: Mathematics, Motion, and Being" Oxford Handbook of Spinoza edited by Michael Della Rocca, Oxford University Press (forthcoming)
• "Without God: Gravity as a Relational Quality of Matter in Newton" Vanishing Bodies in Early Modern philosophy edited by Dana Jalobeanu and Peter Anstey (Routledge, 2011), 80–102